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of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
, and dealing with assistance to those in america, the richest country on the face of the earth, who are going hungry, a large number of whom are children who live in america. the committee on agriculture passed out a bipartisan bill in the last congress and it was never brought before my republican friends. this year the committee also passed out a bipartisan bill that was brought to this floor. it could have and should have been passed with a bipartisan vote. not because i agreed with all of it, but because it was appropriate to have a bill to go to conference with on this important subject. our republican friends added three amendments which we harmful to clearly those in need in america. as a result, we didn't vote for it, but that's not why it failed, mr. speaker. it failed because 62 republicans voted against the bill reported out with every republican voting in committee for it. one was mr. lucas, the chairman of the committee observed, it apparently wasn't good enough for those 62 republicans. compromise seems very difficult for some people in this house. but i again remind us all it
growing. we'll have a live update on "good morning america." >>> the search for a missing woman in oakland, california, has led police to a person of interest. they're combing through a fairgrounds after questioning a registered sex offender who dated sandra coke 22 years ago. he was spotted with her on sunday, the day she went missing. he has a long criminal history, that includes kidnapping and rape. and he was previously charged in two murders. >> we have not arrested this person in this case. but we are looking at this person as a person of interest. they have had history of dating. they are known to each other. >> coke is an investigator for the federal public defender's office. her family and friends have put up a $100,000 reward. >>> two college friends of suspected boston marathon bomber dzhokhar tsaranev, face charges for throwing away fireworks and other items they found in tsaranev's dormroom before capture. if crickonvicted, they will spe0 years in prison. >>> the atlantic hurricane season has been fairly quiet so far. but there may be busy months ahead. the forecast is calling
from america and its allies is on the cards. we just don't know when it might come. but as syria's ambassador to the u.n. said the country right now is in a state of war and preparing for the worse. >> that's john terrett reporting. bam as der. when you look at that bam and when you, might that be the reason why there has been hesitancy to get involved with syria. >> i don't think so at all. i think that if the united states wished to apply direct military force to take out the syrian air force, for example, it could do so. we face terrorist threats were hezbollah and iran already, and yes, it can get worse, but at the same time i think we're facing those things already. the issue for the. >> obama: administration ifor ff the conflict. >> can you talk about the question of why chemical weapons have become the red line? thousands of people were killed in syria by the government already, we didn't take action. >> right. >> suddenly because chemical weapons are used we're taking action. what sense does that make? >> yes, it's an interesting point of view. my point of view is really
mayoral candidate and the man who will be paying for the braces on the teeth of america's comedians, anthony weiner. first, something more important. your right to vote. after months on the political sidelines, mrs. clinton took up the fight yesterday, condemning the supreme court's recent position to gut the voter's rights act and the string of red states rushing to aid in its demise. yesterday, north carolina joined texas, mississippi and alabama in passing strict voter i.d. requirements, a move mrs. clinton says will usher in the old demons of discrimination. >> in 2013, so far, more than 80 bills restricting voting rights have been introduced in 31 states. now, not every obstacle is related to race but everyone who says that racial crimination is no longer a problem in american elections must not be paying attention. >> john: the speech delivered before the american bar association, the first of a series of addresses mrs. clinton plans to give this fall, each one addressing a challenge she says is undermining america's faith in government. well, hey, why wait? i'm sure she's jus
. if you work 20 years in america, paid into social security, on someone else's number and you can prove it, not worth anything. .. must present a government i.d. with a photo. the employer enters this into a computer in the e-verify system and watches for the photograph to come up. if the official government photograph for that name doesn't match the one that they have in their hand, you can't be hired. so this is going to make the work place a lot tougher and any employer who hires someone who doesn't match up, they're subject to fines an penalties. and finally, i think it was hector who told the story about overstaying a visitors visa. 40% of the undocumented people in america overstayed their visas, visitors, tourists whatever they may be. we'll have a system under this law that will track people not only as they come in on visas but as they leave on visas. this is a tough enforcement bill and those who say it isn't haven't taken a look at it. when it comes to the border, i will tell you something i had to grit my teeth as they put another 700 miles of fence and billion dollars on the b
to the role that america has played in that region for a long time. now, it's important that people know that, to get your point, because it's important for people understand what we're doing, why we're doing it, to understand first of all that our alliances are strong and we stand behind our alliances. second, that we are not picking a fight with anyone. we are not trying to militarize a situation there. we would like what has been happening in decades past to keep going. democracy has been spreading across -- prosperity has been spreading to a huge economic and political development and a part of world without any conflict at all. so that's the fight that we have on the pivot and that's why we're doing it and that's why we're saying what we're doing. nobody it's the wrong idea by the duty provided the of why we're doing it spent we only had a couple of minutes left and mechanical of our time because the to the invoke year is they put us on planes and send us back. we will take two questions. kimberly and no here. we'll take a cu key and then you can pick which one you're answering. >> you m
and magical ♪ ♪ the happy train's on track ♪ because america is back ♪ yeah! ♪ woo hoo! come on! ♪ - wait, what? [all cheering] - ♪ america is back ♪ america is back - wait, according to that scale, i still have a small wiener! - ♪ america is back - i'm still [bleep] angry! - ♪ back and we're back and we're back ♪ ♪ we're so back, we're so back ♪ ♪ back back back back back ♪ captioning sponsored by comedy central from comedy central's world news headquarters in new york, this is the daily show with jon stewart. [ cheers and applause ] >> john: welcome to the daily show. [ cheers and applause ] my name is john oliver. i am still sitting in for jon stewart who has been spending the entire summer at training camp with the new york giants. apparently he's extremely happy and in almost constant pain. our guest tonight tv legend and host of the new show crowd goes wild on fox 1 regis philbin is here. [ cheers and applause ] oh, yes, indeed. we start tonight with the news media. now, personally i get all my news from jon stewart and the daily show. which is why i have absolutel
of providing care to everything in america, not only will you not get care tomorrow, we'll take the dollars you use to get care today, and the supreme court said that was an outrageous use of federal power. seems like there's lots of examples in the history, and in our present of using the tax code to treat some people in some states differently than we do people in other state, and to use the affordable care act as a hammer, not an approach, but the stick. did you consider those things -- do you agree with my analysis of those two circumstances as they exist today, and did you consider those in the analysis that you performed? congressman, yes, we are aware of the provisions that you -- >> the stick approach opposed to the cater approach. >> as i said in the review of the legislative history, the floor debates, there's no evidence that there was any discussion of the carrot stick approach in connection with the premium tax credits. >> okay. but it is consistent with past irs practice to treat folks in some states differently than we treat folks in other states based on statute? only those with
>>> making news in america this morning -- breaking overnight, a new terror threat, forcing precautions overseas. americans being told to leave another country. >>> wild world. the rain keeps coming in parts of the country. triggering flash floods and the dramatic rescue of a newborn baby. >>> facebook shocker. a woman found dead. the suspect's facebook friends get a look at the crime scene plus a confession. >>> and a man turned a trash dumpster into a home. complete with bed, bathroom, and that's not all. >>> good friday morning. u.s. interests in pakistan are under threat this morning because of new terror fears. the state department is warning americans against travel there. >> they say there's a specific threat against the u.s. consulate in lahore, pakistan's second-largest city. abc's kristin fisher joining us on the latest details from overnight. >> reporter: diana, john, the key word is specific. this is a specific threat against the u.s. consulate in lahore, which is why only a handful of emergency personnel have been allowed to stay. all americans are now being urg
as you know is one of america's most influential voices on cultural, political and education issues. he's the senior pfizer to project lead the way and on the advisory board of -- a chief education adviser to be in stock innovation. he is taught at boston university the university of texas at harvard and served as secretary of education under president reagan and was america's first drug czar under president george h.w. bush. it was the author of more than 24 books including to new york times number one bestsellers and the host of the old bennett's morning in america and has received more than 30 honorary degrees and as a final note a very long time ago bill and i were philosophy students together at williams college. bill will speak in a minute. he will be followed by david wilezol the co-author of "is college worth it?." david is the associate producer of the nationally syndicated bill bennett's morning in america and a contributor to the manhattan institute's higher education policy blog and at claremont institute fellow and studied greek and latin at the catholic university in washi
, and will be replaced by al jazeera america. in our time here in "the war room" we have focused on important political stories from our march goes on series, to controlling the playing of gun violence in this country and the immigration reform debate that continues to rage on. joining me now inside "the war room" are two of my current colleagues and friends, john fugelsang, the host of "viewpoint, who has the second best hair on this network, and my very close friend, "the young turks" studio in los angeles cenk uygur. thank you both for joining us in "the war room" one last time. >> thank you, michael. >> thank you. >> michael: john, i'm sgoorth with you what do you think the impact that current tv has had on the progressive discussion if any at all? >> well, that's a good question. i have to say it was positive, if not necessarily profound. while this whole experience has proven that liberals are very good at capitalism, i'm very happy for mr. gore, i don't think network had the chance to make the proper impact it could have had had it had proper promotions behind it. i think if we would have had a
exposure to europe, china, latin america. you know i think europe and china are turning, one of the reasons why the euro is so strong for europe term. as for latin america, bud's business has been held back by the weakness in brazil. i know brazil's troubled, but i don't think that weakness is going to last. the world cup comes to brazil in 2014 followed by the olympics in 2016. i think you're going to believe those are going to be pretty darn good for beer sales. bud sells for 17.4 times next year's earnings estimates, gets fair priced considering all the good things going this company's way. although, of course, obviously like everybody else, like it on a pullback. here's one. this is what the crowd drinks in summit, molson coors, tap, i see it similar to bud but with less international exposure and a stock run up further. specifically 18% year-to-date. that's why i'm saying that bud has more room to run because it's well behind this one. and certainly well behind this one, although, this one is an up and comer. suppose you want something stronger than beer, though, then the pick is very
today for different reason. we had the same in latin america. people my grated to vens with a lay from countries such as peru on a consistent basis for half a century. it's a wealthier country than venezuela. look at it this way as well. chinese immigration in the united states has played a key role in the growing economic prosperity of china, they have not only of course been able to export stuff and import stuff to them. they invested in china response i think that borders and barriers are really art initial term of the impact on the economy. we all benefit from the constant circulation as people. the same is happening in europe. some of the eastern -- or central european countries have been -- in the last few years. it became legal to do so. and yet they have been becoming more and more prosperous. poland is more prosperous. it export the an incredible amount of people to spain. >> i have some small things to add. he's 100% right. about the german 1848ers. they left behind complained about the liberals leaving. americans who experienced and met them complained about the autocratic g
, the weekly standard, and the group concerned veterans for america. coming. you all for i am normally not intimidated at these events, but now that i realized who is here, now i am very worried. have all of you. i also want to thank you for your service, how pleased i am that peter king and john stossel have agreed to be here, judy miller and john bernstein as well. in afghanistan, i was visiting with a couple of people in 2011. to trainvolunteered the afghan army. i remember him telling me at the time one of the key principles was to keep it simple. that is a key military principle. pete organized this event in the opposite way. two speakers, four panelists, john and i are co-moderators. luckily, the quality of the people overwhelm the complexity. we will have peter king speak for 10 minutes, john stossel speak for 10 minutes, and then we will have a panel. judy and gary will kick off, and a discussionhave it ihave of security. these are people who have thought seriously about this. i will give a brief introduction of pete king and john stossel and then get off the stage. peter king
angry, america. >>> good morning, america. i know some people that are really happy. here are the winning numbers in the lottery. get it out. 5, 25, 30, 58, 59 and the powerball, 32. >> oh. foiled by 32. >> just -- i was just going to say, that 32. >> we were close. line up because we've all gone winless. except for three. two of them coming actually in new jersey. here's one look at little egg harbor. it is in the sandy disaster zone. so, some real joy headed to a place that could use it. meanwhile, our linsey davis tracking the latest overnight from another winning location in the state of new jersey. that's where we find her. south brunswick, the place. linsey davis, good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning, josh. this is the super stop 'n shop. things opening up here. we were able to talk to one of the employees not too long ago inside. and he was telling us this isn't normally the place that has lottery frenzy. if you wanted to line up for a powerball ticket, there was no line at all. and while he has no idea who purchased that winning ticket, he's convinced som
. it is a struggle of a lifetime. to redeem the soul of america. we still need to find a way to humanize our political institution, our businesses, and our system of education. 50 years later, those of us educated to the full -- calls of justice, need to appease ourselves. our struggle is an ongoing struggle. there will be progress. there will also be setbacks. we must continue to have hope and be still in our faith that this nation will become a truly multiracial democracy. we must continue to work. we must not give up or give in. keep the faith. and people hurting and suffering, we must be ready to take action, cast our votes, and move our feet. we must have a sense of urgency to use the power rented us to help end human suffering. we as a people and a congress understand our differences do not divide us. we will be at our best when we accept that we are one people, one american family, that we all live in the same house. the american house, the world house. understand that no one, but no one, is breathless. everyone can make a contribution. the march on washington is saying to us today th
is america's money. >> good morning, topping america's money, the price at the much just keeping on dropping. gas prices have slipped 7-cents in one week, now down to $3.56 a gallon. isle refineries have been keeping output high. will apple take a bite out of blackberry? potential buyers may be rival apple or google if only to get their hands on that technology. and facebook c.o.o. is getting her hands on a huge chunk of cash. she sold a 5% block of her facebook staff. said to be worth $400 million. and move other james patterson, james has knocked them off the highest paid list. even bypassing other literary giants like danielle steel and steven king that's america's money. >> "i'm terry mcauliffe, candidate for governor, and i sponsored this ad." it's been called "cuccinelli's witch hunt" "designed to intimidate and suppress" ken cuccinelli used taxpayer funds to investigate a uva professor whose research on climate chge cuccinelli opposed. cuccinelli, a climate change denier, forced the university to spend over half a million dollars defending itself against it's own attorney general. ken
told this reporter the great thing about america is there's all these jobs. that's not something americans think, like there's all these jobs. the other thing on these immigrants said was, the other great thing about america is that if you work hard you can get ahead in this country. >> i was here in texas a month or two ago, and it was a small business, just one little taxi come and the driver was an immigrant. i asked him about his experience when he came to america. he said when i arrived it was like i was woken up and i had these opportunities. >> i think it's kind of ambitious drive that is unique to immigrants. let's face it, there's -- 99% of the people in the world never move from where the girl. watauga but the 1% of people are ambitious enough and courageous enough to leave your homeland is a very courageous thing to do. so this is as an economist, i just think this is one of the kind of innate advantages of having immigration. number one, they are preselected for kind of economic success. and number two, this gets back to my point about china, let's face it, the bigges
: in fact america filled 60 million prescriptions for sleeping pills last year alone. we are among the most sleep medicated countries in the word. >> we are a 24 hour a day country. we are always on demand. >> reporter: evidence of the widespread use is prevalent on face book where people post "can't fall asleep. taking my ambien. lights out y'all. and ambien, i got to agree that i have a love/hate thing with you. i'm talking to a doctor about getting off of you. >> you have people that come to you and say i want to get off of this. >> all the time. the majority of the patients i see. >> reporter: not being able to sleep can be a curse, affecting a person's ability to function. research shows sleep aid do work, allowing us to catch much needed zs. is a drug-induced sleep just as good as falling asleep the old-fashioned way. >> a lot of people feel it is real sleep. a lot of people don't feel the sleep quality is good. >> reporter: the doctor points out only a limited number of studies looked at long term effects of chronic use. that is something people don't lose sleep over as they. pop ano
. america live starts right now. >> starting with the fox news alert. a big opening blast on what is described as the potential coming war over who gets to vote. welcome everybody to america live and so there are debates breaking out over how our elections should be held and what rules will be in place when it comes to voting. the issue erupted after the supreme court went down and that gave a bit more power to set their own rules on these things and that ruling sparked protest and drew sharp criticism from the justice department and former secretary of state addressed the issue at an event that many will be a 2016 presidential run for her. >> we have seen a sweeping effort in our country to obstruct new obstacles to voting. under cover and addressing election fraud. in 2013, so far, more than 80 bills restricting voting rights are introduced in 31 states. not every obstacle is to race. but those who say racial is not a problem in the election must not be paying attention. >> that is from hillary clinton. >> our host of power play. chris. chris, is this the makings of a battle tha
offered a chilling prediction for america that she calls inevitable. we will cover her less than an uplifting words. next. with centurylink as your trusted partner, our visionary cloud infrastructure and global broadband network free you to focus on what matters. with custom communications solutions and responsive, dedicated support, we constantly evolve to meet your needs. every day of the week. centurylink® your link to what's next. the. lori: and outgoing homeland security secretary napolitano leaves as long as surveying secretary after holding the position 4.5 years this season to a tax of america's sial and our chief corresppndent has our report. >> consider taking questions to napolitano address the national press club here in washington. >> looking back i can say there is one take away one object lesson of a core operating principle i have learned and embraced as secretary it is this, in a world of the fall the threats come to the key to our success is the ability to be flexible and agile. >> the longest serving homeland security secretary also the first woman to hold the
napolitano offered a chilling prediction for america th she calls inevitable. inevitable. we will cover her@áh%h%k%k%k5 aaah! aaaaah! theres a guy on the window! do something, dad! aaaah! aaaah! what is happening? they're rate suckers. their bad driving makes car insurance more expensive for the rest of us. good thing there's snapshot from progressive. snap it in and get a discount based on your goodriving. stop paying for rate suckers. try snapshot free at progressive.com. the. lori: and outgoing homeland security secretary napolitano leaves as long as surveying secretary after holding the position 4.5 years this season to a tax of america's sial and our chief corresppndent has our report. >> consider taking questions to napolitano address the national press club here in washington. >> looking back i can say there is oneake away one object lesson of a core operating principle i have learned and embraceds secretary it is this, in a world of the fall the threats come to the key to our success is the ability to be flexible and agile. >> the longest serving homeland security secretary also th
history, talking about the pentagon papers, the water gate scandal, more recently their top secret america piece -- series, the walter reed medical hospital series that won him the pulitzer. there's the question of like is there going to be an investment -- and is there an investment in had this digital age in terms of that kind of reporting, that kind of granularity, that kind of fact finding and that commitment to stories that may not get a lot of click-throughs at the beginning or ever but matter in terms of information and awareness. >> well, i think the answer is both yes and i hope so, and it has to be. a couple things. a lot of this is due -- a lot of the kinds of journalism that you are talking about is due to the commitment of the families and the people who own these institutions. as john said, the grahams. i was lucky to have worked for the grahams because "newsweek" where i worked for many years is owned by "the washington post" company. i had a lot of of company with him. the grahams were an inspiration. before that i worked in louisville for the bingham family that owned "the
to this year's printer's row literary festival to hear about "the cooked seed." then on to bookexpo be america in new york city city with erica jong who talks about "fear of flying." and we finish with author and radio talk show host larry elder at the los angeles times festival of books as he discusses his memoir about his troubled relationship with his father in "dear father, dear son." booktv in prime time all this week on c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: well, with the announcement this week that "the washington post" has been sold to jeff bethos, we thought we'd take this opportunity to look at changes in the newspaper industry and the potential future of the news industry in general. we have two guests joining us this week. first, we want to introduce you to alan mutter. he is in san francisco, and he is a newspaper consultant, he's a lecturer as well at the university of california berkeley on media economics, and he has served as a newspaper editor, a cable tv executive and a tech
as you know is one of america's most influential voices on cultural political and educational issues. he's a senior at visor at project lead the way and on the advisory board of audacity.com and chief education advisor to -- he has taught at boston university university of texas and harvard and served as secretary of education under president reagan and was america's first drug czar under president george h.w. bush. that was the author of more than 24 books including two "new york times" number one bestsellers and a host of bill bennett's morning in america has received more than three honorary degrees bill and i were philosophy students together to bill will speak in a minute and he will be followed by david wilezol the co-author of kathleen tighe. david is the associate producer of the ashley syndicated bill bennett's morning in america contributor to mining the campus a policy blog. in his honor i tried to come up with an opiate let end quote addressing student debt and i suggest -- that is happy is he who has no debt. [laughter] >> that's good. [laughter] we look forward to your pres
. and so, after nine years of separation an arrival gate in america. pure joy. >> hi, daddy. christie maynard who heard their story stepped in to help the family. >> very pretty. >> reporter: she took her on a shopping trip on her first day in america. >> it is so cool. >> yeah, let's go. it is so overwhelming, it makes me feel complete. >> reporter: and she already has a big american dream. >> i want to be a doctor, like for women who is pregnant, and small kids. >> reporter: ast steory that red us, sometimes god smiles and those who lived through dark days in africa can find light in a country founded on hope. bob woodruff, abc news, new york. >> what a great way. >> love that story. >> what a great we to end our newscast. the family reunited after nine years. boy do they have stories to tell each other. >> what a wonderful young woman she is. >> she will be a doctor. >> bet you she will. >> i can't wait to see it happen. good for them. >> see you in a little bit. ♪ >>> this the new york city police department now has to be part of the solution because the judge has agreed with us
there are 40 million muslims in america? these images that's we see of burning vehicles, they will be everyday. host: ok, to a for the call. this is from marie -- obama got us into this debacle in egypt prompting me muslim brotherhood. there is this headline, the journalists among the dead in egypt, including the husband and a former "post" reporter who was killed. more details on mick deane, who was killed in cairo. a statement from the british prime minister david cameron who paid tribute to the reporter on twitter -- i am sad to hear the death of cameraman mick deane. my thoughts are with his family and a sky news team. my next call is rich from fairfax, virginia. republican, good morning. caller: thank you for taking my call. i was disgusted last night was watching the news, and i saw a caterpillar bulldozer into their where thesehe area people were. that equipment i'm sure was bought with money the united states gave the egyptian army. i just think of how that equipment is used in this country, to build things, and we are over there destroying stuff. it just makes me sick. we need to stop
for america from the steps of the lincoln memorial. his indelible words a watershed moment in the civil rights movement. today thousand also gather to commemorate the famous words that forever changed our country. >> 50 years ago there was so much fear, people were afraid to be afraid. the fear is gone. our country is better and we are a better people. we still have a distance to go. >> reporter: that distance front and center today as the nation's first black president will add his vision as the marquee speaker at the anniversary celebration. president obama acknowledges that, while a lot of progress has been made, king would not be satisfied. >> we have not made as much progress as the civil and social progress that we've made, and that it's not enough just to have a black president. >> reporter: there are renewed calls for addressing socioeconomic and racial disparities. the recent acquittal of george zimmerman and the shooting death of trayvon martin drew many to the streets across the country with protests. the president acting with candor. >> there are very few african-american in this c
or bad. yes, the long-term concern is there. if the papers go away america will be in very serious trouble because when you get down to it the television reporters are , what that one guy said, they are lap poodles. it is basically nothing more than lap pools for house members here in phoenix. you just do not know what is going on in washington from the electronic media at all. for the callou this morning. on that subject that you talked about on the future of newspapers and specifically what might happen with "the washington post," and this bezos -- by jeff might've contributed to part the sale. here's a bit of what he said. [video clip] was latemily was in -- in adopting a payroll product, which most of the major market has already started doing. the fact that they could've started that years ago, the way the financial times or the wall street journal had done years ago, i think maybe that certainly hastens their financial difficulties, that they were so late to doing a pay wall. politico is a block in bc. they have a high tier subscription product, which seems to be doing very w
. those are twot key questions being asked in the wake of major developments on america's crime beat. >> reporter: attorney general eric holder unveiled sweeping new criminal justice reforms saying long prison terms for drug offenses are not making the u.s. safer. >> we need to ensure that incarceration is used to punish, to deter, and rehabilitate, but not really to warehouse and to forget. >> reporter: meantime, the federal judge delivered a significant ruling. saying a hard line approach in new york city, a policy, stop and frisk has violated the constitutional rights of minorities. it was a blow for mayor michael bloomberg with far reaching implications. >> if this decision were to stand it would turn those precedents on their head and make our city and in fact the whole country a more dangerous place. >> reporter: the judge appointed a federal monitor saying police discrimination against blacks and latinos was widespread. with hundreds of thousands of innocent people stopped over the last decade. violent crime is down in new york and across the country. but if these tough laws g
"america's got talent" the little dog bailey and dance partner. they will be here live this morning. >>> we do begin this half hour with a close call in california. police say a situation there was milliseconds from tragedy when a scene being shot for a movie got too real. >> reporter: as linda bergsly approached a coffee shop she saw something that made her hair stand on end -- armed, masked men threatening people inside. >> there was a gun. >> reporter: she quickly called 911. >> one pulled the gun out of the pocket. >> reporter: police rushed to the scene, prepared for a potential gun battle. >> by all intents and purposes it was an armed robbery and cops responded as such. >> reporter: an audio device captured what happened next. >> what are you doing? we're shooting a short film. >> after they stripped him the gun, he saw the film crew. >> reporter: the gunman and supposed hostages were actors, shooting an independent film. >> they didn't pull permits and didn't notify the police department. do. of an important thing to >> reporter: but according to the glenn dora city website, the fi
of america merrill lynch. we will grow by 8.2% this year, beating china for the fifth straight year. the energy front, our oil production has increased by 50% since 2005. iraq a expects to increase oil production to 4.5 million barrels by the end of 2014 and 9 million barrels a day by 2020. as the international energy agency has reported, iraq is poised to double our export of oil by the decade of 2015. -- of 2050. we will use our strained global oil markets. in spite of this progress, we have challenges that we are working to address. 90% of our economy depends on oil. unemployment rate is 11%, our poverty line rate is 23%. although there has been significant progress over the last few years, and we think the development millennium goals set by the united nations. in order to diversify our economy beyond energy, iraq is investing oil revenues in education and crucial development projects, including restoration of power and rebuilding our transportation system. our economy will benefit from our progress on the germanic front as well. last month, the united nations security council r
in a row is pretty suspicious and bank of america says they'll try to -- >> common practice, it happens constantly with young kids in that -- >> sad story. >> drinking red bull and coffee. >> yeah. >> that's just the culture? >> absolutely. >> but let's not in any way start to assign a bank or anybody else -- >> no, no, not a bank, just the culture of investment banking. >> and it's the culture of the competitive nature for college kids now trying to get jobs. it is, you bust a gut to try to get these, even unpaid internships, maybe not pulling three all-nighters. >>> the "new york daily news." dr. oz came to the rescue of a 23-year-old british tourist. the tourist was sitting near a fountain outside of this building, rockefeller center, when a taxi cab jumped the curb, trying to run down a bicyclist in what witnesses say was a foot of road rage. dr. oz heard the crash and went to the scene to assist the victim along with other first responders. reports say she lost part of one leg. apparently there was a plumber there, he used his belt as a tourniquet and that helped save her life. >>
reporters discuss their book "whitey bulger: america's most wanted gangster and the man hunt that brought him to justice." , the trialgan -- began june 12, 2013. [applause] >> thank you for coming out on such a beautiful day. we don't get a lot of those here. i'm with the chicago tribune, write a business column with kevin and shelly murphy of the boston globe who are here not to do scouting on the chicago black hawks. [laughter] but to talk about their new book on whitey bulger, the boston mobster caught on the lamb after, what, 16 years, and first of all, let's get -- you guys have been boston journalists for quite a long time at this point. >> somebody said between us it's, like, what, 16 years? yeah, we've been chasing him combined total for 25 -- i mean, 25 each, so 50 between us. >> wow. i was reminded in the beginning, when i was a kid, my father was taking a friend of mine to go see butch cassidy and the sun dance kid. he said, you know, remember, whatever the movie makes of them, they are the bad guys, and the other thing that it reminded me of was the old line from mel brooke in
've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> labor day just a couple of weeks away. we're firing up the barbecue because it's cookout week here on "mad money." and you know what, this cookout really couldn't have come at a better time. with the market feeling like it's ready to take a bit of a breather, you might want to side l up to more defensive stocks. perhaps in the spirit of what liquor can do for you. last night, i told you about the healthy organic food i'll be grilling up. you can't have a barbecue with nothing more than just tofu and soy milk. the key ingredient to any cookout is brewskis. and looking like we've got a burgeoning red hot bull market in the beer stocks. in the first four weeks ending on the 3rd, beer sales up 3.8%. that's a huge acceleration from the 1.8% increase in the pre
worse. the pace of decline of america's middle class has actually speeded up in the obama years. median income down 4.4% since june of '09. >> so he accelerated income ee quality. >> he increased it. we're going to watch varney and company on friday. the friday edition is always the best and often ends in song. >> it is? >> yes. >> there's a promo. >> thanks, everyone. >>> this guy says black people can't survive unless a lot of whites are killed. and guess what? he works for the department of homeland security. so why hasn't he been fired? a former department of justice employee says he knows and he's going to join us next. >>> and barely even back to school, just beginning to look like christmas at some stores. what the heck is happening? we'll tell you why this year is different and starting much earlier. >> oh, no. ♪ so then the little tiny chipmunks go all the way up... ♪ [ female announcer ] when your swapportunity comes, take it. ♪ what? what? what? [ female announcer ] yoplait. it is so good. icaused by acid reflux disease, relieving heartburn, what? what? relief is at han
and so much rubble. this is fast becoming a simmering civil war. one of america's great allies in this region, awash in blood. on one side, the government admitted that 36 islamists in its custody were killed. while on the other, militants slaughtered two dozen egyptian police. the main concern as the killing continues is turning this new generation into fighters against not only the egyptian military, but the u.s. as well. martha raddatz. abc news, cairo. >>> olympic printer and double leg amputee, oscar pistorius, will be tried for the murder of his girlfriend next march. one of the developments from pistorius' court appearance yesterday. pistorius admitted to killing reeva steenkamp in february. he says he shot her by accident. pistorius face is a life sentence if convicted. >> now back at home, central idaho, residents are slowly allowed to return to their homes which have been, had been threatened by a fast-moving wildfire. abc's aditi roy is on the fire line. >> reporter: fanned by west winds, the beaver creek fire burns deep in the hills of sun valley, idaho. more than 1
and our values. and to others around the world, i want to make clear once again that america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. our intelligence is focused above all on finding the information necessary to protect our people and, in many cases, detect our allies. it's true -- protect our allies. it's true, we have surveillance capability, but it is also true that we have shown a restraint that many governments around the world won't even think of doing or refuse to show. that includes, by the way, some of america's most of her -- most we should not. forget stricter guidelines. some other governments will throw their citizens in prison for what they say online. let me close with one additional thought. the men and women of our intelligence community work every single day to keep us safe because they love this country and believe in our values. they are patriots. and i believe that those who have lawfully raised their voices on the -- on behalf of privacy and civil liberties are also patriots who love our country and want to live up to our highest ideals. so this i
's the chart. as josh brown pointed out this morning, for those who were -- thought this bet on america, on an american recovery was misguided -- >> or naive. >> slammed it in their face. stock's up 31% this year. >> to go back to the point as well, book value which buffett likes to use, up 2% for the quarter. in a period where travelers, some of the other big insurance competitors suffered because of their exposure to what was happening in the bond market. buffett what does he do? he buys companies. concentrated stakes in equities which did well in the second quarter and that helped outperform a the lot of his peers. >> buy a railroad, utility company in nevada hoping on recovery from recession there. big mac cr macro bets. >> tyson food, 69 cents, beat business 9 cents. revenue a beat. chicken and beef volume, up 4%, hard to do in this in economy. >> especially with beef prices the way they are. >> interesting you mention that. chicken feed costs up $105 million in the quart, less than 335 in the first half. the thinking is, they're looking at commodity costs coming down, even as pric
. >> is it likely? >> i don't know the answer to that unfortunately because law enforcement management in america at the federal level is a disaster. >> do you agree with that, mitch? that's a pretty big statement. >> those are strong words for somebody who used to be a u.s. attorney. he outranks me. i'm not going to try to take that one out. >> you must be right. possible certainly isn't a lot of support for the federal prosecutions that we have in this country. >> i have great respect for the agents and the u.s. attorneys around the country who do a very difficult job. i was a u.s. attorney, i was an independent counsel. i've had a lot of experience. but i'm going to tell you something, federal government has gotten too big, federal law enforcement agencies have gotten too big. they are manageable. nobody know what is they're doing. look at the latest story about how the dea is providing information to the nsa interc t intercepts and are being told to lie to federal judges about it. you cannot have law enforcement functioning where they are told it's okay to lie to a federal judge about how a
and how we can bring our a game to the table every day to serve america's communities that have many times too little access to health care. so i wanted to welcome you all to the room and welcome senator ben cardin to the room who is no stranger to baltimore medical since and has been around i got here, and that is like 300 years ago. senator was at the very beginning of a great assist to baltimore medical system when we had our help waiver. we had a medicare demonstration project for many years, and every time it looked like it was going to end or expire come -- the senator could be counted on to not only sure it will be realistic but to renew the effort to make sure that happened. when we wanted to build a brand- new building, he was the first one i came to see. which started the conversation when he was on one side of the hill and ended the conversation on the other side of the hill because it took that long for us to get the job done but the senator was responsible for the first public money coming into this venture that eventually grew into the building you were all sitting in now. fo
, massachusetts. the town is number one on "money" magazine's new best small towns in america list for weathering the recession well and having a big lake and being close to both boston and providence. so close that you can commute to work in either city. it is also diverse. nine churches, seven synagogues and one of the largest mosques in new england. louisville, colorado, and vienna, virginia, round out the top three. >> bill: never heard of that city in massachusetts. nine churches in a town of 17,000? congregations are rather small, i would say because some people do not go to church at any rate. what we have -- very significant yesterday. there are two unrelated decisions regarding -- related to law enforcement that really were related. they weren't planned that way but they really do fit together and say something very important, i think, about law enforcement in this country. a lot of us have said for a long time that we went way overboard, you know. 10, 20 years ago. the last -- the previous generation about -- gotta be tough on crime. tough on law enforcement. crack down on crime. throw
.m. eastern here on cing span 3. c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your it's provider -- by your television provider. >> host: and this week on "the communicators," gordon smith who is president and ceo of the national association of broadcasters, our guest reporter is paul kirby of telecommunications report. senator smith, you started at nab nearly four years ago. how have the issues changed in those four years? >> guest: well, it seems like the issues just keep on coming, and they tend to be very major issues affecting both radio and television. but clearly on the radio side, the whole issue of performance rights, performance tax, whatever you want to tribe it as, is an ongoing challenge. hopefully, the day will arrive when both the digital and the terrestrial platform can come up with a model that actually grows music and works for both. but right now one has an unsustainable business model, and the other one works for radio, but on the other hand, we need it to work for the performers too. but if you provide a rate t
family. see the obama's new, adorable puppy. >> america's favorite mini-commander-in-chief. landing a big scoop and pretty coveted kiss. all ahead in "the skinny." it's tuesday, august 20th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now" with john muller and diana perez. >>> good tuesday morning. we are going to begin this half hour with news of a significant arrest in egypt. spiritual leader of the muslim brotherhood in police custody. >> this comes as the u.s. is considering its options in the region. abc's karen travers joining us from washington with more on this. karen? >> reporter: good morning, diana. good morning, john. secretary of defense chuck hagel admitted yesterday there isn't much the u.s. can do right now. this is up to the egyptian people. an uneasy calm in egypt, a break from the horrific violence last week. but a brazen daylight attack in the sinai peninsula. militants ambushed two buses carrying off duty police officers forced them to lie on the ground before they shot them 25 were killed. here in washington the obama administration is anxiously monitoring the s
-man, captain america and batman work for sundland window cleaning. the company is donating time and the costumes. wearing the mask means you have to think quick. kids have a lot of questions. >> who is the easiest guy to take down? >> hmm, the joker. >> the joker. >> reporter: when you are chronically ill it forces you grow up. the job of healing and recovery can be pretty intense when confined in a hospital for weeks even months. so a superhero distraction like this reminds kids that, well, they're just kids. >> there is research done on laugher and how it helps the body heal. watching the kids out here down and talking with the superheroes, i think that's exactly what was going on. >> reporter: little abby can't help but feel there is nothing she can't d i love to see her smile. >> abby didn't like that mom was facing the camera. mom, mom. >> therapeutic for kids and parents. >> yeah. >> that's wonderful. >>> we want to tell you, next week, national dog day monday. we want to help you show off your best friend. theut p it should be a lot of fun. e-mail us at wnnfans.com. inclu
. >> scuba diver busted smuggling weed into america from canada. he scuba dived it. brought the weed across, scuba dive. in the pvc pipe here. he had eight pounds of it. apparently 1:00 a.m. in the morning, border patrol looks at the surveillance camera, see the guy swimming across the st. clair river. he's towing this pvc pipe pick him up. lo and behold. 8 pounds of dope in the pipe. dope coming from canada. usually it's the south up instead of north down. >> true. very good point. equal opportunity there. ♪ politics and foreign wars all the weather all the scores ♪ ♪ that's the "world news" polka ♪ ♪ tapes that roll in way too slow stuff you saw on koppel's show ♪ ♪ that's the "world news" polka ♪ ♪ it's late at night you're wide awake and you're not wearing pants ♪ ♪ so grab your "world news now" mug and everybody dance ♪ ♪ have some fun be a pal every anchor guy and gal ♪ ♪ do the "world news" polka >> ukulele monsters! nsteranstersansterssters! ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ have some fun ♪ be a pal ♪ ♪ not lip-synced ♪ it's the world news polka all right! yeah!
boy. but anyway, this was actually -- you know, mika, you were probably too young, but america stopped, actually. >> absolutely. >> america stopped and it was -- there was something shocking about a man playing a woman in tennis. >> a man getting his butt kicked. >> well because -- >> yeah. >> joe -- >> paid off. by the way -- >> time to move on -- >> we should have seen this. >> the last gasp of the republican party, right? >> should have seen this a mile away. >> the republican party? >> they don't like women, right? >> it was rigs. >> the only guy -- the only way they could beat a man was if he threw the match, right? >> joe, you're missing a wild -- >> i'm hearing it, but, howard, proves once and for all, the hate mail on twitter today is a marxist because everything, absolutely everything, goes back to politics for marxists. all right. there we go. >> joe calls howard marksesist on -- >> don't -- marxist, everything goes back to politics. >> i don't know no. >> i'm not talking about your ideology but the tennis match and you bring it back to republicans. >> miley cyrus. >> come on
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